Menu
Call us
Book now
     "Where everyone is 
treated like an elite athlete"
 
           Button

 

 
Appointments call

 (02) 4954 5330 

             Opening hours  
 
     Monday to Friday  8:30am – 7pm
 
 
 
Download  our  Low Back Pain  eBook      Back book

Older & Wider

It probably comes as no surprise that you are wider at the age of 40 or 60 than you are at the age of 20. What may surprise you is why.

A new study published last May in the Journal of Orthopaedic Research shows that hip bones continue to grow with age in both women and men.

pelvis

By age 20, most people have achieved their maximum height. But researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine have now found that while people don’t grow taller after age 20, they do grow wider well into their 70s. This growth is not fueled simply by an increase in body fat, as was previously thought.

The researchers randomly selected 246 male and female patients in various age groups ranging from age 20 to age 79. Using CT scans, they determined that the width of the people’s hip bones continued to grow after skeletal maturity was reached at age 20. Specifically, the pelvic inlet widened–evidence of actual pelvic growth.

The results: on average, the pelvic width of the oldest people in the study was nearly 2.5 cm larger than the youngest patients. This increase in pelvic diameter could lead to an approximately 7.6 cm increase in waist size from age 20 to age 79, whether or not body fat increases.

While it’s nice to be able to blame expanding girth on your bones, it is still important to maintain a healthy weight through diet and exercise. We can’t stop our pelvises from growing, but we can prevent an unhealthy increase in body fat. Excess body fat raises the risk for illnesses ranging from diabetes to heart disease.

This entry was posted in General. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

AntiSpam * Time limit is exhausted. Please reload the CAPTCHA.